Recipe: Shou Wu Chih Chia Pudding

Chia (Salvia columbariae) seeds Français : Akè...
Chia (Salvia columbariae) seeds Français : Akènes de Chia (Salvia columbariae) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Aztec and Mayan empires revered chia seeds for their virility boosting benefits on the body.  Chia seeds are high in omega 3’s, fiber, antioxidants, protein  and they’re also gluten-free! Chia seeds taste good in and on almost anything. I was introduced to them by a dear friend and i have loved them ever since.

Shou Wu Chih is a chinese herbal blend that works nicely with the body to build the kidney (root) energy. Look in this blog for information on the Root Chakra to see why this tonic should be taken alone or in this recipe. This longstanding tonic is a strong compliment to nourishing the kidneys which are also known as the bodys ‘batteries.’

The Recipe is Vegetarian friendly by the way and Vegan friendly too!

Shou Wu Chih Chia Pudding~

There are 3 ways to make this pudding. Whichever one you choose to make simply add ingredients to the blender and blend for 30 seconds. Pour in a glass or bowl and enjoy!

This is so good I’m going to make some more another day this week!

Option one: The Original Chia Pudding

3 Tbs of Shou Wu Chih (buy this herbal tonic from most Asian markets costs around $6.00)

1 cups of almond milk  (vanilla or chocolate or plain)

1/8 tsp of cinnamon

1 Tbs raw honey or 2-3 dates

1 large banana

4 Tbs of Chia seeds (brown chia tasted delicious in it but any chia seeds should work just fine)

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Option two: The Raw and Dirty Nutty Chia Pudding

3 Tbs of Shou Wu Chih (buy this herbal tonic from most Asian markets costs around $6.00)

1 cups of water

a handful of nuts of your choice; cashew, almond or pecan nuts (soak them over night first) 

1/8 tsp of cinnamon

1 Tbs raw honey or 2-3 dates

a taste of vanilla bean or vanilla extract

1 large banana

4 Tbs of Chia seeds (brown chia tasted delicious in it but any chia seeds should work just fine)

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Option 3: The Raw Sweet and Buttery Coconut Chia Pudding 

3 Tbs of Shou Wu Chih (buy this herbal tonic from most Asian markets costs around $6.00)

1 cups of water

2 Tbs almond Butter

1/8 tsp of cinnamon

1 Tbs raw honey or 2- 3 dates

1 large banana

4 Tbs of Chia seeds (brown chia tasted delicious in it but any chia seeds should work just fine)

Do you enjoy Chia seeds and Herbal tonics as much as we do? Please share you’re experience and thoughts with us please.

Raw Honey Cures Herpes

jar of honey

The following article is very exciting and important to me as a physician who treats all kinds of cases, but one of the most frustrating to me and my patients is the very common problem of herpes, or cold sores, fever blisters, etc that is plaguing modern society. Some have estimated that up to 70% of American adults have some form of herpes infection and that it is regularly passed on to others, usually loved ones. Herpes has broken up marriages, prevented marriages, interfered with relationships, caused suspicion and finger pointing, ruined lives, engendered guilt,  caused suffering and social isolation. All due to a nasty little virus that seems to pop out at the worst of times, sometimes in a prominent part of the body, like the lips, or in private intimate areas, like the genitals. One sore can last for weeks at a time and the frequency of outbreaks can be astonishing. Prescription drugs may work a little bit, but do not prevent outbreaks reliably or prevent spread to others; condoms don’t work either. Although the nutritional profile of a herpes outbreak can be complex, generally an outbreak signals a severe calcium deficiency due to the calcium poor diets of most Americans who do not consume raw milk. Below is an article that informs us of the wonders of raw medicinal grade honey (manuka) in the healing of herpes sore compared to prescription drugs. The honey won.

Honey Works Better than Drugs for Herpes!

Posted By Dr. Mercola

Mainstream physicians usually prescribe Acyclovir ointment or other topical medications to treat herpes outbreaks. But new research shows that nature has a better solution.This remedy works faster than any of the mainstream treatments, and with fewer side effects.

Honey has long been regarded as one of the best natural wound healers and infection fighters. When a researcher treated patients with Acyclovir for one herpes outbreak and honey for another, overall healing time with honey was 43 percent better than with Acyclovir for sores on the lips and 59 percent better for genital sores.
According to Nutrition and Healing:

“None of the volunteers experienced any side effects with repeated applications of honey, although three patients developed local itching with the Acyclovir.”

Herpes can be broken down into two primary infections: 

  1. Herpes simplex (oral and/or genital herpes)
  2. Herpes zoster (also known as shingles; a reactivation infection of the chickenpox virus)

In this case, the type of herpes in question is the genital type of herpes simplex. This study is a perfect example of nature’s capacity to provide answers for just about any physical ailment as genital herpes can be notoriously painful and difficult to treat.

Treating Herpes with Honey

Sixteen adult subjects with a history of recurrent labial and genital herpes attacks used honey to treat one attack, and a commonly prescribed antiviral drug, acyclovir cream, during another. (It’s important to realize that neither the drug nor the honey will actually cure genital herpes. They only treat the symptoms.)
Interestingly, honey provided significantly better treatment results.
For labial herpes, the mean healing time was 43 percent better, and for genital herpes, 59 percent better than acyclovir.
Pain and crusting was also significantly reduced with the honey, compared to the drug. Two cases of labial herpes and one case of genital herpes remitted completely with the honey treatment, whereas none remitted while using acyclovir.
The best way to use this treatment is to first make sure that you have RAW honey as it will work far better than regular processed honey. My preference is Manuka honey. Make sure you find one that is a semifluid. All you need to do is apply some of the honey directly to the open sore. Apply at least four times a day, but more would likely be better as the goal is to keep it constantly bathed in the honey.
As for side effects, three of the subjects developed local itching with acyclovir, whereas no side effects were observed even with repeated application of the honey.
The researchers concluded that “topical honey application is safe and effective in the management of the signs and symptoms of recurrent lesions from labial and genital herpes.”

What You Need to Know About Honey

Honey — which was a conventional therapy for infection up until the early 20th century when penicillin took center stage — has recently started inching its way back into the medical mainstream, but it’s important to realize that not all honey is created equal.
Some kinds of honey should never be applied to an open sore or wound, and the antibacterial activity in some honeys is 100 times more powerful than in others.

Processed, refined honey that you typically find in grocery stores is NOT appropriate for use in wound care. In fact, your average domestic “Grade A” type honey will likely increase infection.
It also will not offer you the same health benefits as raw honey when consumed.
Manuka honey from New Zealand is a specific type of honey that has actually been approved for use as a medical device, due to its healing properties and superior potency. But you could also use raw honey – it’s just not as potent as Manuka.

Good quality honey offers several topical wound-care benefits that can explain some of its success as a remedy for herpes sores:

  • It draws fluid away from your wound
  • The high sugar content suppresses microorganism growth
  • Worker bees secrete an enzyme (glucose oxidase) into the nectar, which then releases low levels of hydrogen peroxide when the honey makes contact with your wound

Manuka
Clinical trials have found that Manuka honey, made with pollen gathered from the flowers of the Manuka bush (a medicinal plant), can effectively eradicate more than 250 clinical strains of bacteria, including resistant varieties such as:

  • MRSA (methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus)
  • MSSA (methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus)
  • VRE (vancomycin-resistant enterococci)
  • Helicobacter Pylori (which can cause stomach ulcers)

With the increasing threat of antibiotic-resistant infections and drug over-use, the return to honey as a natural, multi-purpose healing therapy is certainly a welcome alternative.

Other Natural Therapies for Herpes Infections

Aside from honey, here are a few other remedies that have also been found effective in treating herpes infections:

  • Lysine (an essential amino acid)
  • Proline (an essential amino acid) ~Added to original article by Bliss Returned~ It works.
  • Vitamin C
  • Aloe Vera
  • Lemon Balm (Melissa officinalis)
  • Resveratrol (a very potent antioxidant from grape seed)
  • Garlic
  • Lactoferrin (a potent antimicrobial protein found in colostrum)

In addition to these remedies, which all tend to work, in my experience the two approaches that work the very best are:

  1. Homeopathic herpes simplex formula –– I’ve found these homeopathic formulas to be rprisingly effective. They’re also non-toxic so they’re very safe, with virtually no side effects.
  2. The Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT) – This is a form of psychological acupuncture without needles. By tapping on different acupuncture meridians, you can energetically resolve the emotional precedent that caused your immune system to weaken, allowing the infection to take hold. Once you get at the emotional root, your immune system tends to get reactivated, along with a number of genes that can help to resolve and heal your physical condition.

Last but not least, there’s some evidence suggesting that high doses of vitamin D can help resolve herpes infection, although I do not have personal experience with this treatment. But there have reportedly been a large number of successes with people using up to 50,000 units once a day for three days.
It would be particularly effective if you have not been taking vitamin D regularly and have not had frequent exposure to the sun.
If you’ve had your vitamin D levels tested and are within the therapeutic level, then clearly you don’t want to use this approach as you may overdose on vitamin D. However, more than likely, if you had optimal vitamin D levels you probably wouldn’t have gotten the infection in the first place.
We know vitamin D works for flu’s, coughs and colds, and appears to work for most all the typical types of viral infections – even infections like herpes.

Poetry for the Soul~

Dream & Visualize your prize, allow your light to grow…witness the glow- ing..there is nothing to fear..if you know what you are..never let that image go..The universe is your home. The Creators lifeforce is in you…you are all knowing..all powerful..everywhere all the time.. never second guess that.. create your paradise at will divine one..focus and be still..vibrate high-ER..celebrate this life fully…and know that…Harmony shall reign supreme no matter what it looks like right now..its all an illusion… Flow…with it…Seek Peace…Return to Bliss as much as you can…give thanks for the power to choose..AHhhh… ~DivineBiss~ ♥ Just say Yesss! OMM

What Are Carbohydrates and Why Are They Important in your Lifestyle?

You’ll also hear terms like naturally occurring sugar, added sugar, low-calorie sweeteners, sugar alcohols, reduced-calorie sweeteners, processed grains, enriched grains, complex carbohydrate, sweets, refined grains, and whole grains.

No wonder knowing what kind and how much carbohydrate to eat can be confusing!

On the nutrition label, the term “total carbohydrate” includes all three types of carbohydrates. This is the number you should pay attention to if you are carbohydrate counting.

It’s all about carbs!  Carbohydrates control is the first step in gaining control of your blood sugar numbers. Carbs are the food group mainly responsible for raising blood sugar. While the body can make glucose from the protein and fats you may eat, it is slower in action and doesn’t usually cause the “spike” that carbs do.
Carbohydrate food

There are three types of carbohydrates — sugars, starches and fiber. To know how much carbohydrate you eat, you need to be clear about which foods are primarily carbohydrate and which contain enough carbs that they require counting. It’s not necessary to count “sugars” separately, they’re contained in the carb count and are basically still a “carb”.

In a healthy diet, most carbohydrate should come from nutrient-dense foods. Nutrient-dense foods and complex carbs like whole grains, fruits, legumes, vegetables, nonfat or low fat milk, and yogurt contain a high volume of vitamins, minerals, fiber, and protein in proportion to their calorie content. These don’t cause your blood sugar to “spike” as high or as fast.

Simple sugars are quickly absorbed into the bloodstream and can cause your blood sugar to rise very fast and high. These simple sugars are contained in fruit juices, regular sodas, many candies cakes and pies or other baked goods especially those made with white flour. Certain vegetables such as white potato and corn as well as many fruits also contain a large amount of simple starch and sugars and can cause the same blood sugar spike.

Sugar is another type of carbohydrate. You may also hear sugar referred to as simple or fast-acting carbohydrate. There are two main types of sugar:

  • naturally occurring sugars such as those in milk or fruit
  • added sugars such as those added during processing such as fruit canned in heavy syrup or sugar added to make a cookie

On the nutrition facts label, the number of sugar grams includes both added and natural sugars.

There are many different names for sugar. Examples of common names are table sugar, brown sugar, molasses, honey, beet sugar, cane sugar, confectioner’s sugar, powdered sugar, raw sugar, turbinado, maple syrup, high-fructose corn syrup, agave nectar, and sugar cane syrup.

You may also see table sugar listed by its chemical name, sucrose. Fruit sugar is also known as fructose and the sugar in milk is called lactose. You can recognize other sugars on labels because their chemical names also end in “-ose.” For example glucose (also called dextrose), fructose (also called levulose), lactose, and maltose.

Complex Carbohydrates

Complex carbohydrates require your body to do more processing to break them down for fuel, and usually take longer to get into your bloodstream. This causes a slower blood sugar rise usually. 

Natural complex carbohydrate foods can be less fattening than animal-protein foods that naturally contain fat and contain less calories.

Natural complex carbohydrate foods table
Vegetables Legumes Grains and cereal
 Beets  Red kidney beans  Rye
 Carrots  Mung beans  Whole wheat flour
 Onions  Lentils  Sunflower flour
 Parsley  Peas  Wheat bran
 Leeks  Bog beans  Rice bran
 Brussel sprouts  Black-eyed peas  Buckwheat
 Peppers  Soybeans  Breakfast cereals
 Cauliflower  Pinto beans  Barley
 Cabbage  Field beans Oatmeal

Starch(also known as complex carbohydrates)

Foods high in starch include:

  • Starchy vegetables like peas, corn, lima beans, and potatoes
  • Dried beans, lentils, and peas such as pinto beans, kidney beans, black eyed peas, and split peas
  • Grains like oats, barley, and rice. (The majority of grain products in the US are made from wheat flour. These include pasta, bread, and crackers but the variety is expanding to include other grains as well.)

The grain group can be broken down even further into whole grain or refined grain.

A grain, let’s take wheat for example, contains three parts:

  • bran
  • germ
  • endosperm

The bran is the outer hard shell of the grain. It is the part of the grain that provides the most fiber and most of the B vitamins and minerals.

The germ is the next layer and is packed with nutrients including essential fatty acids and vitamin E.

The endosperm is the soft part in the center of the grain. It contains the starch. Whole grain means that the entire grain kernel is in the food.

If you eat a whole grain food, it contains the bran, germ, and endosperm so you get all of the nutrients that whole grains have to offer. If you eat a refined grain food, it contains only the endosperm or the starchy part so you miss out on a lot of vitamins and minerals. Because whole grains contain the entire grain, they are much more nutritious than refined grains.



Fiber

The structural component of plants. We are unable to digest a lot of the fiber in foods, and the fiber that our bodies can digest usually takes longer and creates less of a “spike” of blood sugar. Potatoes, dry beans, grains, rice, corn, squash and peas contain a large amounts of starch. Vegetables like broccoli, cauliflower, asparagus, lettuces and other greens are not starchy. The stems and leafy parts of plants do not contain much starch, but they do contain fiber. Since we can’t digest a lot of the fiber, that means that the green and leafy vegetables contain fewer calories than the starchy vegetables. Fiber is a diabetic’s friend because it takes longer to process in the body and slows down the absorption of the carbs.

Fiber comes from plant foods so there is no fiber in animal products such as milk, eggs, meat, poultry, and fish.

Fiber is the indigestible part of plant foods, including fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, and legumes. When you consume dietary fiber, most of it passes through the intestines and is not digested.

For good health, adults need to try to eat 25 to 30 grams of fiber each day. Most Americans do not consume nearly enough fiber in their diet, so while it is wise to aim for this goal, any increase in fiber in your diet can be beneficial. Most of us only get about ½ what is recommended.

Fiber contributes to digestive health, helps to keep you regular and helps to make you feel full and satisfied after eating. Additional health benefits, of a diet high in fiber — such as a reduction in cholesterol levels — have been suggested by some so may be an additional benefit.

Good sources of dietary fiber include:

  • Beans and legumes. Think black beans, kidney beans, pintos, chick peas (garbanzos), white beans, and lentils.
  • Fruits and vegetables, especially those with edible skin (for example, apples, corn and beans) and those with edible seeds (for example, berries).
  • Whole grains such as:
  • Whole wheat pasta
  • Whole grain cereals (Look for those with three grams of dietary fiber or more per serving, including those made from whole wheat, wheat bran, and oats.)
  • Whole grain breads (To be a good source of fiber, one slice of bread should have at least three grams of fiber. Another good indication: look for breads where the first ingredient is a whole grain. For example, whole whe+at or oats.) Many grain products now have “double fiber” with extra fiber added.
  • Nuts — try different kinds. Peanuts, walnuts and almonds are a good source of fiber and healthy fat, but watch portion sizes, because they also contain a lot of calories in a small amount.

In general, an excellent source of fiber contains five grams or more per serving, while a good source of fiber contains 2.5 – 4.9 grams per serving.

It is best to get your fiber from food rather than taking a supplement. In addition to the fiber, these foods have a wealth of nutrition, containing many important vitamins and minerals. In fact, they may contain nutrients that haven’t even been discovered yet!

It is also important that you increase your fiber intake gradually, to prevent stomach irritation, and that you increase your intake of water and other liquids, to prevent constipation.

Because fiber is not digested like other carbohydrates, for carbohydrate counting purposes, if a serving of a food contains more than or equal to 5 grams of dietary fiber, you can subtract half the grams of dietary fiber from the total carbohydrate serving of that food.

Try to get your carbohydrates from healthy sources such as whole grains, fruits and vegetables. But remember, even complex carbs are carbs and must be limited to avoid spikes in blood sugar.

Carbohydrates and Metabolism

Once the digestion process has begun and the food components are in your blood stream they are either used for energy, stored in the liver and muscles as glycogen, or if there is more energy available than you can use, they are converted and stored as fat.

The storage of glucose is triggered by insulin, which forces your body to store any extra blood sugar as glycogen. People with diabetes or metabolic syndrome either can’t produce enough insulin or they are not sensitive enough to the insulin they produce and need to regulate their blood glucose with medications, insulin or dietary changes.

How To Count Carbohydrates

Start by giving yourself some limits: Some suggested limits would be for women 20-40 per meal and 15 per snack. Men can usually have higher limits. Remember,  these are just suggestions. By testing you will find the amount of carbs that work for you.

How many carbohydrates should you eat a day?

Everyone has different carb needs, it depend on active or sedentary lifestyle you have, men or women you are. It is nearly 60 percent of the calories you eat every day should come from carbohydrates.

calories and carbs intale table
person low physical activity
calories/ carbs (g)
high physical activity
calories/ carbs (g)
Children 2-3 years old  1000/ 125  1200/ 150
Children 4-8 years old  1200/ 150  1400/ 175
Girls 9-13 years old  1600/ 200  1800/ 225
Boys 9-13 years old>  1800/ 225  2000/ 250
Girls 14-18 years old  1800/ 225  2200/ 275
Boys 14-18 years old  2200/ 275  2800/ 350
Females 19-30 years old  2000/ 250  2300/ 287
Males 19-30 years old  2400/ 300  2900/ 362
Females 31-50 years old  1800/ 225  2200/ 275
Males 31-50 years old  2200/ 275  2800/ 350
Females under 50 years old  1600/ 200  2000/ 250
Males 50 years old  2000/ 250  2600/ 325



A few foods like table sugar and lollipops are entirely carbohydrate, so their weight on a gram scale will be exactly the same as the number of grams of carbohydrate they contain. Most foods, however, have only part of their total weight as carbohydrate. The carb content of these foods can be determined by food labels, reference books or software, or a scale.

Like any new skill, counting grams of carbohydrates will take a couple of weeks to master. You will need to weigh and measure foods consistently for a while. As time passes, you will train your eye to estimate accurately both serving sizes and weights, whether eating out or at home. As you look up the foods you commonly eat, make a list of them for easy reference. Keep that list next to your food log, and use it to figure the carbs in a meal before you decide how much to eat.
Pastas and whole-grain breads contain complex carbohydrates, which are long strands of glucose molecules. Nutritionists recommend that 55–60 percent of calories come from carbohydrates, and especially complex carbohydrates. [Photograph by James Noble. Corbis. Reproduced by permission.]
Food labels contain information you need to do carb counting. Just be sure your serving size is the same size as the serving on the label, or calculate on the basis of the amount you’ll be eating. For example, lets say you want to eat an 8 ounce carton of low fat yogurt. The label that tells you that a one cup or 8 ounce serving contains 18 grams of carbohydrates. If the serving you eat differs from the serving size listed on the package, you will have to weigh or measure your actual serving and do some minor calculations to determine your carb amount. Also look for “tricks”.  A muffin label might say 20 grams and you say “Great, I can have that many”.  Then you look at the serving size and it lists half a muffin!  Would most people eat half?  Watch out for tricks like this.:smileymad:

Medicinal Uses of Honey

Honey has been known for its healing properties for thousands of years – the Ancient Greeks used it, and so have many other peoples through the ages. Even up to the second world war, honey was being used for its antibacterial properties in treating wounds. But with the advent of penicillin and other antibiotic drugs in the twentieth century, honey’s medicinal qualities have taken a back seat.

Today, many people swarm to honey for its antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties. Holistic practitioners consider it one of nature’s best all-around remedies.

Treatment with honey is called apitherapy,which includes replenishing energy, enhancing physical stamina and improving immune systems. Honey also is considered to have a calming effect on the mind and promotes sleep. Honey also helps indigestion and has sometimes been used to treat cardiovascular disease and respiratory complaints. A thin coat of honey can be applied on the skin to disinfect and heal minor skin wounds and chapped lips.

Here’s the truth behind the claims about honey’s health benefits — and an important warning.

Never Give Honey to an Infant

Honey is natural and considered harmless for adults. But pediatricians strongly caution against feeding honey to children under 1 year old.

“Do not let babies eat honey,” states foodsafety.gov, a web site of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

That’s because of the risk of botulism. The spores of the botulism bacteria are found in dust and soil that may make their way into honey. Infants do not have a developed immune system to defend against infection, says Jatinder Bhatia, MD, a Georgia neonatologist who heads the American Academy of Pediatrics’ Committee on Nutrition.

“It’s been shown very clearly that honey can give infants botulism,” a paralytic disorder in which the infant must be given anti-toxins and often be placed on a respirator in an intensive care unit, he says. Bhatia has never seen a case of infant botulism.

The National Honey Board, which the USDA oversees, also agrees that infants should not be given honey. “The concern for babies stems from the fact that infants lack the fully developed gastrointestinal tract of older humans,” the Board’s web site states.

Antibacterial Honey?

In the laboratory, honey has been shown to hamper the growth of food-borne pathogens such as E. coli and salmonella, and to fight certain bacteria, including Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, both of which are common in hospitals and doctors’ offices. But whether it does the same in people hasn’t been proven.

Shop for honey and you’ll see that some are lighter, others are darker. In general, the darker the honey, the better its antibacterial and antioxidant power.

Honey comes in many varieties, depending on the floral source of pollen or nectar gathered and regurgitated by the honey bee upon arrival in the hive.

Honey producers may apply to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) for a grade on their product, but the score does not account for color. Rather, the honey is judged for clarity, aroma, and flavor, and the absence of sediments, such as honeycomb particles.
Honey and Wound Care

Clinical observations and experimental studies have established that honey has effective antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties. It painlessly removes pus, scabs and dead tissue from wounds and stimulates new tissue growth.

Manuka honey is sometimes used to treat chronic leg ulcers and pressure sores.

Manuka honey is made in New Zealand from the nectar of Leptospermum scoparium. It’s the basis of Medihoney, which the FDA approved in 2007 for use in treating wounds and skin ulcers. It works very well to stimulate healing, says wound care specialist Frank Bongiorno, MD, of Ann Arbor, Mich.

When you apply honey on the wound it helps to retain moisture and leaves very little scar tissue. Due to the density of honey, no fungus or bacteria would grow in the wound.

Honey and Gastric Ulcers.

Clinical and animal studies have shown that honey reduces the secretion of gastric acid. Additionally, gastric ulcers have been successfully treated by the use of honey as a dietary supplement. An 80% recovery rate of 600 gastric ulcer patients treated with oral adminstration of honey has been reported. Radiological examination showed that ulcers disappeared in 59% of patients receiving honey.
Honey and the Common Cold

Maryland family doctor Ariane Cometa, MD, who describes herself as a holistic practitioner, likes to use a buckwheat honey-based syrup to ease early symptoms of a cold. She says it calms inflamed membranes and eases a cough — the latter claim supported by a few studies.

In a study that involved 139 children, honey beat out dextromethorphan (a cough suppressant) and diphenhydramine (an antihistamine) in easing nighttime cough in children and improving their sleep.

“If you’re suffering from a cold or something going on in the throat or upper airways, getting on board with honey syrup will help fight infection and soothe membranes,” says Cometa, who also recommends a buckwheat honey-based allergy medicine.
Honey and Diabetes

Even if honey is natural, it is no better than ordinary white or brown sugar for dieters or people with diabetes, says dietitian Toby Smithson, RD, CDE, a spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association and founder of the web site, Diabetes Everyday.

A tablespoon of honey, in fact, has more carbohydrates and calories than granulated white or brown sugar.

Smithson, who has type 1 diabetes, says she prefers getting carbs from a cup of fresh berries or a carton of yogurt because they have about the same number of carbs as a tablespoon of honey — but less sugar.

“There are some minerals and vitamins and antioxidant properties in honey — the darker the honey, the higher the level of antioxidants — but with yogurt, you can also get those benefits. When you have diabetes, you have to be picky and choosy about carbs and calories.”

Sources:

http://www.honeyo.com/honeyhealing.shtml